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Articles/publications by MWF Officers and Members. For all press enquiries please contact MWF Central Office.

Careers

Publication: The Role Models who Sustain Medical Women's Career Engagement. Who Do They Need to Be, and What Do They Need to Do? 

Are sabbaticals still an option for today's doctors? Kathy Oxtoby interviews Dr Sally Davies for BMJ Careers

Family friendly workplaces for doctors in trainingBMJ Careers, Dr Beryl De Souza and Paul Deemer. 

GPs air their views: Best opinion and debates from 2013 - Pulse, Dr Fiona Cornish and Dr Sara Khan take the top two most read articles respectively.

Do the classic specialty stereotypes still hold true for today's doctors? BMJ Careers, Kathy Oxby asks our members.

Publication: Career Breaks for NHS and University doctors: An analysis of the WAM database
This report highlights the issues raised by doctors in the survey and therefore identifies those factors that can support and deter doctors in returning from career breaks.

Press Release: Patients' and Doctors' Safety: Can women change the culture of the NHS? 

BBC Radio 4 Women's Hour: 'Part-Time GP's' As more women than men train as GPs what affect will that have on patients and the NHS? Dr Fiona Cornish and Anna Soubry MP discuss. 

The Big Interview with Dr Fiona Cornish 
'We need to create an environment where there is more opportunity for women to become leaders in general practice' an interview with Dr Fiona Cornish, filmed by PULSE. Watch the video here.

Letter of the week: Where were the women in Pulse's top 50 influential GPs?  Pulse magazine, MWF President Dr Fiona Cornish, MWF Hon. Sec. Dr Beryl De Souza and Medical Woman Editor Dr Sara Khan. Click here to read the letter.

Women in Medicine in the Press May 2010
There were several articles in the press in May 2010 about the number of women entering medicine. MWF President Dr Clarissa Fabre put forward the case for MWF as did Leigh Regan, MWF's Student Representative at Peninsula Medical School. Articles appeared in the Daily Mail, Sunday Times and Dr Fabre also participated in an interview on Women's Hour, as did MWF members Prof. Jane Dacre and Miss Helen Fernandes.

MWF Response to the EWTD
MWF acknowledges the EWTD has shortened training time. There is need for more evidence to show if there is compromise in patient safety and training if the EWTD reducing working hours to 48 hrs per week is instigated (1,2). We would like to ensure that Deaneries support the Royal Colleges and provide training for the trainers and for the trusts to ensure that both the trainees and trainers have adequate time for training to take place. It is without doubt that service will have been affected as long on call shifts are no longer possible. How much of this was training needs proper evaluation. Considering our flexible training members, there will have been only a small reduction in their hours due to EWTD and its introduction may enable some to work at higher percentages. Training is now competency based rather than time based. Our primary concern is that the Royal College of Surgeons statements (1,2) regarding surgical specialty opt out of the EWTD should not in any way deter our female medical students and junior doctors from pursuing a career in surgery.

References1. BOTA position statement on the European Working Time Directive and training in trauma and orthpaedic surgery – British Orthopaedic Trainees Association . January 2008. 2. The impact of EWTD on delivery of surgical services: A Consensus statement. Association of Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland. November 2008. 

 

MWF News

BBC Woman's Hour Celebrates 100 Years of the MWF
2017 marked the centenary of the Medical Women's Federation. To celebrate, BBC Woman's Hour spoke to leading female clinicians about the women from medical history who inspired them. Professor Dame Parveen Kumar discussed the work of Dr Jane Walker, who dedicated her life to helping Tuberculosis patients with open air sanatoriums and founded the MWF in 2017. The important question of why women doctors still need support to fully achieve equality is discussed, along with the lasting relevance of the Medical Women's Federation in 2017 and beyond.

Publication: Making Part-Time Work
The MWF, funded by the Women and Equality Unit, has been researching ways to facilitate part-time working in the medical profession. The research consisted of interviews and focus groups with part-time doctors of all grades and specialties throughout the UK as well as representatives from the Royal Colleges, Deaneries and HR. Our summary document was published on the 19th June 2008 and the full report can be found by clicking here.

BMJ Careers - The Medical Women's Federation Celebrates its long history
To commemorate MWF's 90th birthday, Honorary Secretaries Dr De Souza and Dr Ramsay wrote an article published in BMJ Careers on why it is still relevant today.

 

Gender Pay Gap

Press Release 29/03/2019 – Gender Pay Gap Review in Medicine
The MWF welcomed the interim findings of the Gender Pay Gap in Medicine Review published  by the Department of Health and Social Care, which the MWF is contributing to as a key stakeholder. The interim findings confirm that male doctors in the NHS earn 17% more, on average, than their female peers.

Press Release 28/05/2018 – Gender Pay Gap Review in Medicine
The MWF welcomed Jeremy Hunt's announcement of an independent review, chaired by Professor Jane Dacre, on how to reduce and eliminate the gender pay gap in the medical profession. 

70 years after the NHS’ foundation there persists a 15% gender pay gap among doctors. Women have always played a central role in the medical profession and over half of medical graduates in recent years are female. It is vital for existing and future generations of doctors that hardworking NHS staff are rewarded fairly and equally for their work, regardless of gender. 

In 2006 data published by the BMA and Medical Women’s Federation indicated there was a 13% gender pay gap for consultants. Recent figures obtained by the BBC from health trusts, the Government and NHS Digital showed that just five out of the 100 top-earning NHS consultants in England are female, despite women making up a third of the total workforce. The figures highlight that, despite recent progress on gender pay, there is still a long way to go to close the pay gap. 

Dr Henrietta Bowden-Jones, MWF President, said:
The Medical Women’s Federation (MWF) welcomes the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care’s announcement of an independent review on how to reduce and eliminate the current gender pay gap of 15% in the medical profession. The aims of the review are to identify the causes of this gender pay gap taking a whole career approach and, from that evidence, develop a series of relevant and implementable recommendations. We look forward to contributing to this important national work."

The MWF will work alongside other key stakeholders to support the development of relevant and implementable recommendations. The MWF maintains a commitment to supporting women doctors in reaching their full potential by providing networking, leadership and mentoring opportunities, as well as campaigning for quality flexible working opportunities in the profession.

MWF responds to BBC gender pay gap figures, February 2018. Responding to figures published by the BBC which shows a gender pay gap among consultants, Dr Sally Davies, MWF Past-President, said:
"We need to do more to support women. They often fall behind when they have children and have to take time off.
"By the time they get to the point where overtime is available or the awards are being handed out they find themselves behind men. It's a serious problem."

Publication: Gender Pay Gap report

Is there equal pay in healthcare? Not if you are a doctor.
Read Past MWF Honorary Secretary Dr Beryl De Souza's response to John Appleby's editorial in the BMJ here.

BBC Radio Wales 'The Gender Pay Gap' - Dr Amanda Owen
Dr Amanda Owen, previous editor of Medical Woman contributed to a Radio Phone-In on BBC Radio Wales on the topic 'Why do women get paid 17% less than men?'. Also appearing on the programme was Dr Katerine Rake, director of Fawcett Society and speaker at MWF's Autumn Meeting 2008.

 

Campaigning

MWF responded to an article in the Guardian re IPSA MPs Parental Leave, June 2019
The Medical Women’s Federation feels it is time for the Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority to recognise parental leave for MPs (Editorial, 19 June). If civil servants on maternity leave are entitled to 26 weeks’ full pay then it would seem only right and fair to offer a similar deal to MPs. The wellbeing of new mothers will impact on the stability of the couple and in turn will ensure a safe and harmonious environment for the new child.
Dr Henrietta Bowden-Jones, Prof Neena Modi and Prof Chloe Orkin 

BBC Radio 4 - Moral Maze: Reforming Abortion Law Provocative and engaging debate on reforming abortion law, chaired by Michael Buerk with Prof Wendy Savage as first witness.

"Why are there so few female specialists in the media, and how can this be changed?" Dr Beryl De Souza & Tami Hoffman on the BMJ Careers Site

Should all advertising of cosmetic surgery be banned? Yes MJ Rapid Response, Dr Fiona Cornish and Dr Beryl De Souza

Is there equal pay in healthcare? Not if you are a doctor.
Read Past MWF Honorary Secretary Dr Beryl De Souza's response to John Appleby's editorial in the BMJ here.

Not Taking Over Just Catching Up
MWF Past President Dr Clarissa Fabre was interviewed by MDDUS's publication about the role of women in general practice.

THE FEMALE FACTOR - The Changing Face of Medical Care
MWF features heavily in this article that appeared in the New York Times and the International Herald Tribune. Members featuring include Dr Fiona Cornish and Dr Beryl De Souza. Click here to read.

 

MWF Press Releases

Press Release 04/07/2020 - NHS 72nd Birthday Statement

Medical Women’s Federation NHS 72nd Birthday Statement

*To be released*

Press Release 29/03/2019 – Gender Pay Gap Review in Medicine
The MWF welcomed the interim findings of the Gender Pay Gap in Medicine Review published  by the Department of Health and Social Care, which the MWF is contributing to as a key stakeholder. The interim findings confirm that male doctors in the NHS earn 17% more, on average, than their female peers.

Press Release 28/05/2018 – Gender Pay Gap Review in Medicine
The MWF welcomed Jeremy Hunt's announcement of an independent review, chaired by Professor Jane Dacre, on how to reduce and eliminate the gender pay gap in the medical profession.

70 years after the NHS’ foundation there persists a 15% gender pay gap among doctors. Women have always played a central role in the medical profession and over half of medical graduates in recent years are female. It is vital for existing and future generations of doctors that hardworking NHS staff are rewarded fairly and equally for their work, regardless of gender.

In 2006 data published by the BMA and Medical Women’s Federation indicated there was a 13% gender pay gap for consultants. Recent figures obtained by the BBC from health trusts, the Government and NHS Digital showed that just five out of the 100 top-earning NHS consultants in England are female, despite women making up a third of the total workforce. The figures highlight that, despite recent progress on gender pay, there is still a long way to go to close the pay gap.

Dr Henrietta Bowden-Jones, MWF President, said:
The Medical Women’s Federation (MWF) welcomes the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care’s announcement of an independent review on how to reduce and eliminate the current gender pay gap of 15% in the medical profession. The aims of the review are to identify the causes of this gender pay gap taking a whole career approach and, from that evidence, develop a series of relevant and implementable recommendations. We look forward to contributing to this important national work."

The MWF will work alongside other key stakeholders to support the development of relevant and implementable recommendations. The MWF maintains a commitment to supporting women doctors in reaching their full potential by providing networking, leadership and mentoring opportunities, as well as campaigning for quality flexible working opportunities in the profession.

Press Release: ACCEA Clinical Excellence Awards 2019
MWF, as a national nominating body, is delighted that ACCEA are proceeding with the 2019 clinical excellence awards round at national and local level. MWF will be encouraging women consultants and academics to consider applying for such awards in recognition of their achievements in the work that is carried out in their respective departments.

Press Release: Medical Woman: the magazine for female doctors 22/05/2013

Press Release: The Department of Health Review of Regulations on Cosmetic Interventions 24/04/2013

Press Release: KEEP YOUR MITTS OFF OUR MUFFS! 

Press Release: Health and Social Care Act Press Release from President Clarissa Fabre, February 2012
The Health and Social Care Bill in England, even as amended so far in the House of Lords, will set the NHS up as a market and will lead to fragmentation of services rather than collaboration. Women form the majority of NHS employees. They are also higher users of the NHS because of their longevity and childbearing capacity. It has been suggested that many services may well become chargeable, for example antenatal and postnatal care and sexual health services which include contraception.

Women are therefore particularly likely to suffer if this bill is enacted. For these reasons the Medical Women's Federation calls on the government to withdraw the bill and genuinely work with the medical, nursing, midwifery and allied health professions to make the changes needed to cope with the increase in the number of elderly people, medical advances and austerity. The bill does not address any of these issues and rather than reduce bureaucracy it seems set to increase it with consequent unaffordable costs.

 

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